Little Christmas spirits with the Christmas spirit


As I looked the Virginia-bound postcards from around the world from the last post, I noticed a couple things in particular about the cards themselves.

One: the charming nature of the illustrations from the 1960s (and that so many Scandinavian ones love little gnomes, called tomtar).

Two: so many of the cards had a word related to "Yule." It got me thinking we should share ways to wish people a Merry Christmas, particularly in the Germanic languages.

German

Frohe Weihnachten und ein Glückliches Neues Jahr -

a common greeting in German-speaking countries.

Danish

Glædlig Jul

Norway

God Jul

which means 'Good Yule!' It sounds something like 'goo-yule'.

A quick YouTube search will show you how it's pronounced.

Swedish

God Jul

We didn't have any Swedish cards from our Virginia collection, so here's one from Jenny Nyström who made a whole collection, many with some version of pigs!

Dutch

Prettige Kerstdagen en een Gelukkig Nieuwjaar - it translates most closely to "Lovely Christmas Days" although it strikes me as kind of like saying have a Pretty Christmas!

Why Christmas Days (rather than just one Christmas Day)? The Dutch greeting reflects the traditional 12 days of Christmas. In fact, the German Frohe Weihnachten has the same spirit and translates literally as "holy nights"

So, we're wishing everyone good cheer and happiness to all and for those celebrating Christmas Frohe Weihnachten, Glædlig Jul, God Jul and Prettige Kerstdagen!

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#Christmas #Norwegian #German #Danish #Dutch #Swedish #Tomtar

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